Exhibitions

Gautam Kansara, Untitled(Red All Over), May 15 – September 30, 2018

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“Untitled(Red All Over)” is a collaboration between Gautam Kansara and his students from the Visual and Performing Arts Department of Manhattan College, New York City. The work addresses the massive amount of daily media that floods our feeds, and that continually overflows in every platform. In Kansara’s photographic and video practice The New York Times looms large as a source material, and is Kansara’s preferred choice for news. Headlines and front-pages from the analog and digital version of The New York Times are layered and overlapped, creating a collage of information that is somewhat impenetrable. The New York Times content which makes up most of the collage is punctuated by small printed screenshots of news from other sources, selected by student in Art 212, and representative of the myriad of sources out there for obtaining news and information. The collage and installation is indicative of the way information, through articles and headlines, is delivered and then forgotten or lost within the news rotation. Also exhibited is a video work which uses cyanotype image transfers of front-pages of The New York Times to create virtual ‘landscapes’ of news and information that is largely deteriorating and fading away, a reference to the temporary nature of stories as they rise and fall within the confines of the news cycle. Kansara’s love affair with The New York Times is in and of itself a complicated web of personal connections and history. (He was forced to read Op-Ed articles at age 12 and was quizzed by his father afterwards. He would be asked “What’s the thesis statement?” And would generally be unable to answer and wound up resenting the experience and the newspaper, only to adopt it in adult life as the portal he visits daily.) Kansara realizes that The New York Times, like most all publications, is flawed, beholden to the bias of its editorial board and that of its reporters. It’s profound pro-israel bias is unmistakeable and obviously problematic. One source is never enough to get to the facts of what actually happened in any given news story. By drawing on multiple sources, by selecting and analyzing and comparing those sources one might be able to arrive at a less biased truth, or perhaps even fact. But in all honesty who really has the time for this. This type analysis is in and of itself a full time job, and one can’t really trust any of the pundits to do the work for them. And so we remain largely ignorant of the facts but heavily influenced by the biased truth. We know so much about so little. Whatever we do know is suspect. And it will all be largely forgotten and replaced the next time I refresh my feed. Things are bad. So much going on. So dramatic. Oh did you see this? What were we talking about?

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Wojciech Gilewicz, Sculptures, 2017 (Work-in-progress), October 2017 – February 2018

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Wojciech Gilewicz “SCULPTURES” , 2017, work in progress), Single-Channel Video “SCULPTURES” aims to rethink, in rather a provocative, ironical, but at the same time quite funny way, the role of sculptural representations in the public realm in different places around the globe. While often decorating or aspiring to decorate, they are in fact simply objects in public space funded by local governments showing off, or manifesting their power by shaping popular aesthetics. Therefore often giving to the general public quite a false perception of what sculpture is, and how it should, or could be interpreted. This ongoing project is a series of various video-recorded performative actions Gilewicz performs in a guerrilla way by using sculptures located in various public spaces including USA, Iran, Taiwan, Poland, Korea, South Africa. Often before performing with a given sculpture Gilewicz asks for some advice or expertise of a professional art conservator or other specialists in the field of restoration. Wojciech Gilewicz (b. 1974) is a Polish-born New York-based interdisciplinary visual artist. He holds an M.F.A from the Academy of Fine Arts, Warsaw, Poland. (www.gilewicz.net) Gilewicz draws on his experience of the painting medium to create formally varied works, also with the use of sculpture and performative actions that seek to investigate the boundaries of art and space. In his recording of reality, Gilewicz often uses the video camera, which can fluidly transform into a means of registering social relations, which take place ‘outside’ his actions performed with or around his paintings or sculptural objects. Gilewicz’s art provokes reflection on the mechanisms which govern perception and its cultural conditioning. The author actively collaborates with the viewer, whom he involves both in his projects and in polemics about myths and stereotypes concerning the most recent art, its reception, and interpretation. Gilewicz takes on board issues related to the role of painting, sculpture, and performance as well as video in today’s world, the status of the artist and artistic work in the context of the institution and the art system as well as the society at large. He is also interested in the role of artist a citizen. His solo projects and exhibitions include Cuboids, Cuchifritos Gallery / Artist Alliance Inc, New York (2015); Rockaway, Foksal Gallery, Warsaw, Poland (2015); Painter’s Painting, Kuandu Museum of Fine Arts, Taipei, Taiwan (2013); Residency Unlimited, Flux Factory, New York (2012); Foksal Gallery, Warsaw, Poland (2009); Front Room: Wojciech Gilewicz, Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, MO (2008); Museum of Fine Arts, Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine (2007); Foksal Gallery, Warsaw, Poland (2005). His group projects and exhibitions include The Travellers, Kumu Art Museum, Tallinn, Estonia (2017) and Zacheta National Gallery of Art, Warsaw, Poland (2016); IDEAS CITY The Invisible City, New Museum, New York (2015); Seven, The Boiler / Momenta Art, New York (2014); Queens International, Queens Museum, New York (2013); Videorover, NURTUREart, New York (2012); Monitaur, Aspen Art Museum (2009); In Practice, SculptureCenter, New York (2009); Factory, MoBY (Museums of Bat Yam), Bat Yam, Israel (2009); Starting Point: Intrude Art & Life 366, Shanghai Himalayas Museum (former Zendai MoMA), Shanghai, China (2009); Hello Goodbye Thank You Again, castillo/corrales Paris, France (2009); BELGRADE: NONPLACES. Art in public space, Museum of Contemporary Art, Belgrade, Serbia (2009); Distortion of an Unendurable Reality, Pianissimo, Milan, Italy (2008); Multi-way Street annex to the exhibition Beautiful Losers, Muzeum Sztuki in Lodz, Poland (2007); and On Their Own Zacheta National Gallery of Art, Warsaw, Poland (2006). The artist’s works were reviewed in Art Forum, Art Pulse, Frieze among others. Gilewicz’ works are in many public and private collections in Poland and abroad, including Shanghai Himalayas Museum, CCA Ujazdowski Castle in Warsaw, and MoCA Belgrad. In Spring 2017 Wojciech Gilewicz established Beach64retreat in The Rockaways, Queens, in NYC for creative individuals as the artist’s response to the rising precarity in arts&culture internationally. The first pilot season is on invitation. There will be an open-call in Fall 2017 for its second season 2018-2019. The retreat is free of charge. (www.beach64retreat.wordpress.com)

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Elisabeth Smolarz, Encyclopedia of Things, April 2017 – December 2017

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ENCYCLOPEDIA OF THINGS is my latest portrait series in which I collaborate with individuals in their home environments. Each participant selects personal objects as portals to memory that are both precious and meaningful, they are then arranged for the camera in a temporary installation. The installations of the participants’ most treasured objects embody their sense of self-hood and identity, and tell the story of each individual. Since starting this long term project in 2014 I collaborated with individuals in North America, Europe, the Middle East and most recently in East Asia. The final result is series of intricate non-concrete portraits consisting of a prevalent vocabulary made out of ubiquitous objects that echo the universality of the human condition.

Immigrating from Poland to Germany, Elisabeth Smolarz grew up on the cusps of two different cultures affected by a communist and democratic system. Consequently, she became involved in the idea of how consciousness and perception is formed by one’s surroundings. Since then her work has been shown nationally and internationally – in venues such as The Bronx Museum, New York, Eyebeam Art + Technology Center, New York, Galeria Aleksander Bruno, Warsaw, Oberwelt e.V, Stuttgart, Kunsthalle Galapagos New York, Baden Württembergischer Kunstverein, Photography Triennial Esslingen, Carnegie Mellon, Independent Museum of Contemporary Art (IMCA) Cyprus, Brooklyn Arts Council, Reykjavik Photography Museum, Espai d’art contemporani de Castelló, the Sculpture Center and the 3rd Moscow Biennale among others. Awards and residencies include the LMCC Work Space Residency, New York, AIM Artist Residency, Bronx Museum, Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen Travel Grant, Karin Abt-Straubinger Stiftung Grant, Sarai Artist Residency, New Delhi, India, Capacete Artist Residency, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Red Gate Gallery Artist Residency, Beijing, China and more. Elisabeth Smolarz received her BA and her MFA from the Staatliche Akademie der Bildenden Künste Stuttgart.

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Amy Khoshbin, The Myth of Layla (TMOL), January 19 – March 19, 2017

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The Myth of Layla (TMOL), 2016
HD Video, TRT- 5:43, color, sound

The Myth of Layla (TMOL) is a participatory multimedia performance and installation about political ideology, celebrity-obsessed media, and an Iranian-American activist named Layla based on Khoshbin’s personal history. TMOL is set in a near future when a big-brother media conglomerate called The Network runs the US government and is at war with Iran. The leader of The Network is a reality show host, similar to our President-Elect, who employs media-manipulation tactics such as fear of the Other, violence, and propaganda as reasonable safety-measures. The Host of The Network invites Layla and audience members to participate on their new reality show, Activists in Sexy Solidarity (ASS), which is the set for the performative installation. Taking satirical cues from the absurd structures of reality TV, Khoshbin presents a backdrop of projected videos and outrageous color costumes and banners. Viewers become part of the piece as audience members on ASS: they are captured by running cameras, screened during the performance, and edited into reality show videos afterwards. TMOL creates a parallel universe that—vividly demonstrating the dangers of media control and the necessity of questioning content production and consumption—echoes America’s contemporary socio-political state.

TMOL has been exhibited as a solo exhibition and series of performances at Mana Contemporary, NURTUREart and The Watermill Center, and is a recipient of the Rema Hort Mann Artist Community Engagement Grant and Creative Capital’s On Our Radar. At Mana Contemporary, the piece was Directed by Morgan Green, Dramaturgy by Yuliya Tsukerman, Performed by Amy Khoshbin, Maxwell Cosmo Cramer, Ryann Weir, Kenny Rivero, and Kristianne Molina, Cinematography by Jessica Gardner, Videography by Azikiwe Mohammed and Matthew Kohn, Lighting Design by Tuce Yasak, and Sound Design by Michael Clemow.

For more information, visit tinyscissors.com.

Amy Khoshbin is an Iranian-American Brooklyn-based artist merging performance, video, collage, costume and sound to examine our individual and collective compulsion to create, transform, and sometimes destroy the stories of who we are, who we think we are, and who we think we should be. She produces media and mythologies using humor and a handmade aesthetic to throw a counterpunch at the high-definition, profit-generating codes and signals that American audiences are trained and accustomed to consuming. She has shown her solo and collaborative work at venues such as Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM), Abrons Arts Center, Mana Contemporary, NURTUREart, National Sawdust, The Invisible Dog Arts Center, and festivals such as River to River and South by Southwest. She is currently in residence at Lower Manhattan Cultural Council’s Workspace Residency 2016-17, and has completed residencies at The Watermill Center, Mana Contemporary- where she curated a group of 12 artists for the BSMT Residency, LMCC’s Workspace Residency 2014-16, Banff Centre for the Arts, Team Effort! in Glasgow, Scotland, and at the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University. She has received a Rema Hort Mann Artist Community Engagement Grant and is on Creative Capital’s On Our Radar for her recent project, The Myth of Layla. Khoshbin has bachelor’s degrees in Film and Media Studies from the University of Texas at Austin and a master’s degree from the Interactive Telecommunications Program at New York University. She has collaborated with Laurie Anderson, Karen Finley, Tina Barney, and poets Anne Carson and Bob Currie among others.

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Seline Baumgartner, One and Others, September 2016 – January 2017

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Seline Baumgartner
ONE AND OTHERS, 2011
HD Video 8min., color, sound

The artists work moves within an area of tension resulting from movement and stagnation, retardation and éclat. At the same time a playful element is a leitmotif in the artist’s oeuvre. It expresses the “other” space, in which social codes and structures of action might be absorbed and turned around. The artist confronts the seriousness of her chosen topics with a certain lightness of being. For us, the viewers, she opens up an imaginary “possibility-space”, mysterious and enigmatic, that leaves us with the substantial question: Why is it the way it is? And: Couldn’t it be different?

Seline Baumgartner (b. 1980) is a New York-based artist born in Zurich, Switzerland. Baumgartner uses video, sound installations, and sculptures to carefully observe the patterns and grammar of individuality and group dynamics. Baumgartner’s solo exhibitions include “One and Others” Kunst 11 Zürich, with Gallery SCHAU ORT, Christiane Büntgen, Zurich, Switzerland (2011); Not Yet, Gallery SCHAU ORT, Christiane Büntgen, Zurich, Switzerland (2010); and Trial 1-3, Final Fish, Videotank, Zurich, Switzerland (2010). Group exhibitions include The Movement, Kolumba Kunstmuseum des Erzbistums Cologne, Germany (2013); Alternativa, Wyspa Institute of Art, Gdansk, Poland (2013); and What Happened 2081, Goethe Institute, New Delhi, India (2013).
Baumgartner received the Dance Movie Commission from Experimental Media and Performance Arts Center (2014) and residencies from Swiss Arts Council Pro Helvetia, New Delhi, India (2011-2012) and City of Zurich, Switzerland, New York (2009-2010). Publications include Aargauer Kunsthaus (2012) and Museum of Fine Arts Bern. Baumgartner received her B.F.A. from Zurich University of the Arts (2005).

For more information, please visit http://www.selinebaumgartner.com/.

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Art 212, Broadway(Storefront/Forefront), September 2016 -February 2017

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In the 1970s David Hockney, a British artist primarily known as a painter, became fascinated with Photography and gave up painting for a decade or so while he experimented with photographic techniques. During this time he developed groundbreaking methods of photographic collage. Hockney explored using the camera to collect fragments of scene, that could then be pieced together. He was interested in splitting up an image in time and space, getting away from capturing only a moment, and trying to capture a collection of moments, a sequence of time, analogous to perhaps a scene in a film.

Because the photographs were taken from different perspectives and at slightly different times, the result is imagery that has an affinity with Cubism, a painting style developed and favored by Picasso and George Braque in the early 20th century, 1910’s and 20’s. Fascinated by Cubism’s investigation of multiple perspective Hockney’s major aim was to explore this through photography. As He saw it there was a relationship between cubism and the way human vision works, in that we see things simultaneously in multiple perspectives and in pieces. We see multiple viewpoints that are then pieced together by our mind.

Seeking to replicate the way we see through photography Hockney began these photo collages, which he called “joiners”, working with different subjects from portraits to still life, and from representational to abstract styles. He did this because he was interested in how we see and depict space and time. He is interested in how we turn a 3 dimensional world into a 2 dimensional image. Upon looking at the final compositions of these “joiners”, he realized it created a narrative, as if the viewer was moving through the room. These images layer time and space, the multiple angles convey a strong sense of movement. Hockney points out that “a single photo expresses a single instant, and so cannot represent time or narrative: “Cubism was total-vision: it was about two eyes and the way we see things. About his collage technique, Hockney said: “I realized that this sort of picture came closer to how we actually see, which is to say, not all-at-once but rather in discrete, separate glimpses which we then build up into our continuous experience of the world.”

In Art 212 we appropriated Hockney’s method and created a homage to his photographic collage technique.


Sujin Lee, “Ah Ahk Ahk Aht Ahn”, February 26 – April 26, 2016

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Sujin Lee

Ah Ahk Ahk Aht Ahn

Ah Ahk Ahk Aht Ahn  – Kiyuk
HD video, B&W, 10:20, Sound
2015

Ah Ahk Ahk Aht Ahn  – Ssang Kiyuk
HD video, B&W, 09:25, Sound
2016

11172 is the number of possible consonant-vowel combinations in Korean language (my mother tongue), which can be displayed in Unicode. They are theoretical combinations for a written language; therefore, many of them are not used in actual speaking and writing.  Ah Ahk Ahk Aht Ahn is a series of 19 single channel videos in progress.  The videos are organized in groups by their first consonant from ㄱ(kiyuk) to ㅎ(heeut). There is a voice prounouncing each consonant-vowel combination shown in the screen. I began this project wanting to focus on the sounds and shapes of the letters and also to contemplate on the physical act of reading aloud. While working on this project, I re-experienced what I felt when I was learning to speak English – being very aware that I am making sound through my body and organs.

Sujin Lee uses text, video and performance, exploring the way in which different cultural and linguistic systems affect the actions of language. Lee has been awarded residencies from Millay Colony for the Arts, Blue Mountain Center, I-Park and Newark Museum and participated in the AIM program at the Bronx Museum of Art and the Emerge program at Aljira. She was a 2012-2013 A.I.R. Gallery Fellow in NYC and a 2014-2015 artist-in-residence at Kumho Art Studio in Korea. Lee earned her BFA from Maryland Institute College of Art.  She holds an MFA in Studio Art and an MA in Performance Studies, both from New York University. She has exhibited internationally.

For more information, please visit http://www.sujinlee.org.

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Walton Fields, Dumitru Gorzo and Molly Stevens, February 19 – April 19, 2016

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Manhattan Project(s) is pleased to present Walton Fields, a photo-collage installation at Manhattan College’s Riverdale, NY campus that documents the site-specific sculptural painting installation by Dumitru Gorzo and Molly Stevens in Walton, NY.

See the Installation live through August 2016 at 218 E. River Road, Walton, NY 13856

DUMITRU GORZO
b. 1975, Ieud.
Lives and works in Bucharest and New York.

Co-founder of the artist group and movement Rostopasca, the most influential artist group in Romania in recent decades, Gorzo has had solo shows in museums such as MNAC, Bucharest; NJ MoCA, New Jersey; Brukental Art Museum, Sibiu; as well as in art galleries and not-for-profit art institutions across US and Europe. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions at prestigious art venues such as the Istanbul Biennial; Marina Abramovic Institute, San Francisco; Kunsthalle Budapest (Mucsarnok); MODEM Modern and Contemporary Art Center, Debrecen; MKM Museum Kuppersmühle, Duisburg; Kultur.
http://www.SlagGallery.com

MOLLY STEVENS
b. 1972, New York
Lives and works in New York City and Walton, NY.

Molly has exhibited her paintings, drawings and videos across the United States, in Europe and in Mexico. She has had solo exhibitions at the Smudajescheck Galerie (Ulm, Germany), Slag Gallery (Bushwick, NY), Living Arts of Tulsa (Tulsa, OK) and Highways (Santa Monica, CA). She received her MA in Art in New Media from NYU, and her BA from Sarah Lawrence College.
http://www.MollyStevensVisualArt.com

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How do you feel about the diverse approaches to the shapes?

DG: It’s probably one of the strongest aspects of the project. Remember, we’re outside, so whether we like it or not, we’re forced to compete with nature. And nature is powerful, diverse and well composed. So the diversity is one of the few things that makes an art installation in this kind of environment possible.

MS: Plus, I think it’s important to be expansive, not reductive; to be wide, not narrow.

Why is outside important?

MS: I love the way paintings look outside. It has to do with the contrast and complement of nature and the hand. I like seeing a tree and an image of tree side by side, for example. But you can’t compete with the actual landscape; you can’t copy it either. They are two different vitalities in an unequal relationship. You can only complement or contrast them. The landscape can easily dominate an outside work, crush it. Artwork could colonize the landscape, but that’s not the goal here.

For how long will be the project up?

DG: Well, we’re planning on one year. It could be less but probably it will be more, at least parts of it. Or, who knows, maybe it’ll became something else.

Is the number of the pieces important. Is there a certain number you are aiming for?

MS: Being spare is precious. Numerousness is more generous; it’s more to look at, and it’s more complex to look at. Numerousness in this case provides many levels of seeing and interpreting. It creates a world. Numerousness in this case also is a way to not be dominated by the surrounding landscape.

How did this project start? Are there any sources of inspiration?

MS: I had worked with Gorzo on smaller projects. I had also been working in a small studio in NYC. When I began working upstate, everything got bigger. If you work in a rural area, you have to deal with what’s outside. In the city, you have to get away from outside when you work.

Do each or some of the pieces have a particular meaning?

MS: Certain themes have emerged. I have a series of portraits of artists, often with plants growing from their heads. That’s about fertility. Two of the pieces that I consider important are the narcissists, people looking at themselves. That’s about image and self-reflection. Then I have words, which I’ve been working with for many years, both as shapes and for their sound and meaning.
DG: If by particular meaning, you mean something literal, then some have a story behind them. Others are like promises and probably many of them are visual constructions independent of words, psychology and myself.

How do you feel about them being outside exposed to the elements?

DG: In a way, the elements function as an age accelerator and that’s part of the process. Who knows, with some luck, some may look better in the end.

Will the work be deteriorated by the end of the project?

DG: Not too much. They’re quite well protected.

How do you think the local community will react to this installation? Is there any reaction you want from the viewer?

DG: We’re not looking for a specific reaction, we’re not entertainers. If somehow we can break the routine of the accidental viewer – which is the most common kind -,  if the question marks in somebody’s head create a story, a need for a story, that’s a good start.

How do two artists work together? How does the fact that there are two artists working together influence the project?

DG: A good part of working closely with somebody during a project is that you sometimes do things that aren’t necessarily part of your usual practice. You move forward, you push and you’re pushed. And sometimes, when you least expect it, you might see the other person coming with a solution for something that you’ve also been searching for.

MS: Sometimes we were working right next to each other, using the same colors and mixtures; and then there are works that were done when we were on different continents. All this time we were moving in the same direction. The target was a field with art. The project was fragile and faceless in the beginning, then it got better, then it broke, then it became alive again.

Are these paintings or sculptures or is it a single installation?

MS: I don’t consider this public art; I don’t consider this land art; I don’t consider this a sculpture park; I consider this an outdoor exhibition of paintings on wood forms. They are sculptural, and together they make an installation. But I don’t want to be strident with definitions.

Can these pieces be shown elsewhere?

MS: These works can be shown in different configurations, on or off the stick.

How does this project correspond to your other work?

DG: This project is part of what we’re doing, a natural continuation our work. There are aspects that are new for each of us and that’s one of the things that makes it worthwhile.

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Sujin Lee, Sound Film, November 15, 2015 – February 4, 2016

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Sujin Lee

Sound Film

‘this landscape
Who Saw What’s on the Top Shelf?
Text to Speech (Statement)

Single-Channel Videos
2012-2013

Sujin Lee uses text, video and performance, exploring the way in which different cultural and linguistic systems affect the actions of language. Lee has been awarded residencies from Millay Colony for the Arts, Blue Mountain Center, I-Park and Newark Museum and participated in the AIM program at the Bronx Museum of Art and the Emerge program at Aljira. She was a 2012-2013 A.I.R. Gallery Fellow in NYC and a 2014-2015 artist-in-residence at Kumho Art Studio in Korea. Lee earned her BFA from Maryland Institute College of Art.  She holds an MFA in Studio Art and an MA in Performance Studies, both from New York University. She has exhibited internationally.

For more information, please visit http://www.sujinlee.org.

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Mallie Sanford, Single-Channel Videos, September 15 – November 15, 2015

Mallie01My work reflects upon a wide range of personal anxieties, which extend from body image to a deep concern for the environment. By combining scanned, found, and handmade objects with live performance and video, I build environments that stage humorous interactions between materials and the body and the anxious relationship between the two. Inventing ways in which an unstable material, form or image can be suspended or preserved is important to my process. I use a flatbed scanner to transform and store an object in digital space. When I scan objects it is in order to preserve and then liberate them as moving images. I integrate them into these videos and animate them in an attempt to transform the relationships and meanings of these objects. These processes of preservation and transmutation are central to the way I find spaces for objects. I have always been drawn to the color green because I grew up surrounded by plants, whether it was the creek in my backyard or my grandparent’s farm. The world of plants and shades of green have been a constant and productive space for me. Working with green-screening allows me to create my own personal ecosystem where I can integrate my own body into a space with these objects that I have transported into the digital. I layer green screen videos on top of one another in a desire to inhabit and develop this space. Through filling, layering, and manipulating digital materials and my digital self, I’m able to satisfy an anxious struggle that I feel to fill empty space.

Mallie Sanford lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. She studied Sculpture + Extended Media at Virginia Commonwealth University, where she received her BFA in 2014. She experiments in many different medias, which include video, performance, installation, painting, digital printmaking, sculpture and music. She has primarily shown her work in Richmond, Virginia, but is starting to become more involved in the DIY art and music scene in Brooklyn. Recent shows in 2015 include This One’s For You, Gallery 5, Richmond, VA; Hold the Phone, Circle Thrift and Art Space, Richmond, VA; and Bushwick Open Studios, R&D Studios, Brooklyn, NY.​

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Karla Carballar, Despúes de las historias de infancia, May 15 – September 15, 2015

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Carballar’s videos are performative actions, based on the artist’s solitary performance for the camera, they tell stories about mental states and personality traits. The camera follows the action as an objective observer, and the subtle transformation captured by it – in long, slow, real time shots – taking the audience on an emotional journey. Through movement, gesture, color, and sound the viewer is invited to enter the internal realm of the characters. The videos have the texture of a dream or a memory, where no questions will be answered, and after which an uneasy feeling remains.

Karla Carballar was born in Mexico City. Her work in video, photography and installation has been exhibited in the US, Mexico, Asia and Europe, including Ex Teresa Arte Actual Museum, Mexico City; Today Art Museum, Beijing; the Stadsschouwburg Theater, Utrecht, NL; Jamaica Center for the Arts, New York City, and Dukwon Gallery, Seoul. She was an Artist in Residence at the Watermill Center in October 2014 with the arts collective Lydian Junction. She has participated in the Bienal de Yucatan, Mexico; and the Encuentro Nacionald e Arte Joven, a year traveling exhibition around Mexico. Karla Carballar holds a Master of Arts from the New York University, and a Bachelor in Graphic Design and Photography form Universidad Intercontinental in Mexico City.

She currently lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.


Priyanka Dasgupta, “pairi-daêza”, February 15 – May 1, 2015

Priyanka

pairidaêza
single channel video installation (silent)
5’23” (loop)
flat screen monitor

pairi-daêza, or ‘paradise’ as we know it today, signifies a place of harmony and contentment, removed from the miseries and suffering of human strife. Across cultures and religions, the word evokes a state of bliss, an utopia. A literal translation of this word however, means ‘to build a wall around’, where pairi translates to ‘around’ and daêza, from diz, to ‘build (a wall)’. This video, in its presentation of an apparent paradise, draws attention to this dichotomy – leaving the viewer with an oasis, that is ultimately just a mirage; an ephemeral, digital image.

Indian born artist, Priyanka Dasgupta’s installations comprise of multiple­channel video and sound pieces, interspersed with large­scale flat sculptures, reminiscent of shadow puppets. The work results from her transcultural identity and the conflicts that arise from this situation. Combining digital and traditional media, Priyanka works across disciplines, making use of multiple, visual language systems to layer the c​ross­​cultural dialogue that is implicit in the themes she explores.

Priyanka is the recipient of an N​EA g​rant (2004). She has participated in the T​ransparent Studio​residency at Bose Pacia (2012), A​ljira Emerge with Creative Capital​(2007) and the AIM Program​(2005), in New York. Priyanka’s installations have been exhibited in the US, Europe and Asia, including the Queens Museum, International Center of Photography, Jersey City Museum, Galleria di Piazza San Marco, the British Film Institute, Lalit Kala Akademi, and Seoul Art Space. Her work has been reviewed by publications including the New York Times, the Times of India, Art India and Take on Art.

Priyanka has a Masters in Studio Art from New York University & the International Center of Photography, and a Bachelors in English Literature from St. Stephen’s College, Delhi, India. She lives in New York, and teaches Contemporary Art and Media at New York University and City College. Priyanka is represented by Shrine Empire Gallery in New Delhi.

http://www.priyankadasgupta.com


Faculty Projects #5, Gautam Kansara, “Wearing Through News”, February 15, 2014 – April 15, 2015

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“Wearing Through News” is an ongoing project that focuses on “important” headlines on the front-page of the New York Times. The importance of a story or headline is usually delineated by the font size. In this project I have focused on headlines that are of the utmost importance according to the editors, in that the font is large and all the letters are capitalized. Such large, capital, bold-faced headlines used to be, in years past, quite a rare occurrence. However, in recent history, as the pace of world events has accelaerated, so has the appearance of these headlines. In 2014 there were more than 10, while in 2001 there were only 2.

The headlines are transferred to T-shirts through the analog photographic process of Cyanotype, which is in fact one of the earliest photographic processes, first discovered in 1842. The process involves a liquid emulsion, which means one can paint it onto almost any surface, like cloth, paper, wood, metal, etc. After applying the emulsion and letting it dry, a contact print process is used to transfer the image to the clothing. The article is then exposed to direct sunlight for about 20-30 minutes. Cyanotype is a UV sensitive emulsion, so the sun is all one needs. After exposing, the article is then simply washed with water in order to develop the image.

In “Wearing Through News” the T-shirts have also been toned with various types and strengths of tea, a common toning agent, to deepen and separate the color. In addition these particular images have gone through an extreme bleaching process that has weakened the fabric. The cotton and the polyester have begun to separate, which means that through wearing and washing the images of the headlines will deteriorate and flake off over time, a reference to the temporary nature of any news story as it rises and falls within the confines of the 48-hour news cycle.

Gautam Kansara (b. 1979, London) is an artist and educator based in Brooklyn, New York. Gautam’s video and photographic work is part of prestigious private collections including The Burger Collection, Hong Kong, The Shreya and Swapan Seth Collection, New Delhi, and the Permanent Collection of the Center for Book Arts, New York City. Since 2002 his work has been featured internationally in numerous exhibitions and screenings, including Alongside the Poison Dartz, Secret Project Robot: Institute for the Living Arts, Brooklyn, NY (2014); Faculty, National Academy Museum, New York City (2013); This is familiar, but I can’t remember now…, Dumbo Arts Festival, Brooklyn, NY (2012); Multiple, Unique, Limited: Selections from the Permanent Collection at The Center for Book Arts in New York City (2011); A Place of Their Own at BMB Gallery in Bombay (2010); No Soul For Sale at X-Initiative in New York City (2009), us between us at Real Art Ways in Hartford, CT (2008); Rencontres Internationales at the Reina Sofia Museum in Madrid (2008); We Will Always Be There For You at Kunsthaus Dresden (2008); TV Dinners at LMAK Projects, New York City (2007); AIM 26 at The Bronx Museum of the Arts in New York City (2006). Gautam has been an artist-in-residence at Smack Mellon, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council’s Swing Space, and the Center for Book Arts, all in New York City. Gautam is faculty at Manhattan College’s Visual and Performing Arts Department, and a adjunct professor at New York University’s Department of Art and Art Professions.


Faculty Projects #4: Gautam Kansara, excerpts from “Save As…”, November 2014 – February 2015

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In the video Save As…(Sculps #4) footage drawn from Kansara’s family life and social life vie for visibility. Each scene is repeatedly fragmented and rebuilt during a kind of tabletop performance, a back and forth of dominating elements. Throughout the process some sense of wholeness is restored to the imagery but it’s no longer the original, it’s not in it’s initial form. It’s been re-made through projection, performance and collage, through materials that include editions of the New York Times, mail/letters, flour, bleach, water, paper, glass, photographs, wood, film, and videos.

The impulse behind Kansara’s work is elusive. The imagery he has created is documentary based, a diaristic mix of memories that is both deliberate and arbitrary. More important than the images themselves is what becomes of them, the process of how they are altered, reconfigured, and overwritten. Put through formal and conceptual changes, the images are distressed, broken apart, reassembled, and rephotographed. Through an arsenal of analog transforming devices, maneuvers, and gestures the imagery as well as the soundtrack is continually fractured and repaired. Shapes that once indicated emptiness become architectural. Narratives are buried within noisescapes. Figures become tangles of line but still manage to emerge.

Untitled(Bleached, Erased, Forgot) consists of 12 bleached C-prints arranged in a partial grid. The images – analog color darkroom prints made by the artist – have been bleached to the point of erasure with only slight traces of the original photographs remaining. This act of destroying a previously made art object is double edged: it is violent, reckless, and sad, yet also an act of re-creation. Ultimately, Kansara positions this as a prism of actively forgetting, highlighting the transient nature of memory, of lived experience.

Daily life is increasingly mediated by recording devices that augment, replace, and alter how we experience events. The tendency to view and record live events through our cameras or phones is so ubiquitous that there is an inevitable negotiation between the experienced and the recorded reality in memory formation. Michael Specter, in his May 2014 New Yorker article, “Partial Recall”, tells us that “until memories are fixed, they are fragile and easily destroyed. It takes a few hours for new experiences to complete the biochemical and electrical process that transforms them from short-term to long-term memories. Over time, they become stronger and less vulnerable to interference. That process is referred to as consolidation by the psychologist Elizabeth Loftus from the University of California at Irvine.”

Elizabeth Phelps and Joseph LeDoux from New York University – according to Specter “among the nation’s leading investigators of the neural systems involved in memory” – posit that for memories to be recollected, the pathways in the brain in which the memory originated must be retraced, and that this act of recall actually changes the memory, a process scientists refer to as reconsolidation. Loftus expresses this with the analogy that “memory works a little bit like a Wikipedia page, you can go in there and change it, but so can other people”.

Specter says of the experiment by Karim Nader, conducted at LeDoux’s lab at New York University, that “Nader had demonstrated that the very act of remembering something makes it vulnerable to change. Like a text recalled from a computer’s hard drive, each memory was subject to editing. Whether the changes are slight or extensive, the new document is never quite the same as the original.”

Digital media and apps like Instagram have brought us into an era of memory profusion, where the sheer quantity of images leads to a devaluing of the past’s hold on the present. Terabytes of digital memories make us care less, as the archive comes to supersede the actual event until ultimately the recordings alter our memories of the events themselves, which are reduced to viewing experiences, where the narrative is open-ended and ripe for a remake.

The works as a whole exposes the malleability and fugitive quality of memory, which modern media saturation accentuates. Our memories are now viewed through a lens that can be re-focused, as well as stored in a document that can be overwritten through the mechanism of Save As…. Kansara’s video and photographic processes mirror the activity of our neural pathways and synapses through which recollections are constantly saving, updating, and transforming along the way. Tinkering with our memories happens while brushing our teeth. The telephone game with ourselves, past, present, and future.

Gautam Kansara (b. 1979, London) is an artist and educator based in Brooklyn, New York. Gautam’s video and photographic work is part of prestigious private collections including The Burger Collection, Hong Kong, The Shreya and Swapan Seth Collection, New Delhi, and the Permanent Collection of the Center for Book Arts, New York City. Since 2002 his work has been featured internationally in numerous exhibitions and screenings, including Alongside the Poison Dartz, Secret Project Robot: Institute for the Living Arts, Brooklyn, NY (2014); Faculty, National Academy Museum, New York City (2013); This is familiar, but I can’t remember now…, Dumbo Arts Festival, Brooklyn, NY (2012); Multiple, Unique, Limited: Selections from the Permanent Collection at The Center for Book Arts in New York City (2011); A Place of Their Own at BMB Gallery in Bombay (2010); No Soul For Sale at X-Initiative in New York City (2009), us between us at Real Art Ways in Hartford, CT (2008); Rencontres Internationales at the Reina Sofia Museum in Madrid (2008); We Will Always Be There For You at Kunsthaus Dresden (2008); TV Dinners at LMAK Projects, New York City (2007); AIM 26 at The Bronx Museum of the Arts in New York City (2006). Gautam has been an artist-in-residence at Smack Mellon, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council’s Swing Space, and the Center for Book Arts, all in New York City. Gautam is faculty at Manhattan College’s Visual and Performing Arts Department, and a adjunct professor at New York University’s Department of Art and Art Professions.

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Karla Carballar, It’s the kind of story I often told about myself, March 20 – May 20, 2014

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The act of looking.
Even more, the act of observing.
The awareness of the present, light, temporality.
A ray of sun filtered through the tree outside the window and hitting a cracking wall.
A small, unassuming plant that’s growing again.
The fortunate combination of colors.
Wind, water, the everyday alive, mundane, unique.

Karla Carballar was born in Mexico City. Her work in video, photography and installation has been exhibited in the US, Mexico, Asia and Europe, including Ex Teresa Arte Actual Museum, Mexico City; Today Art Museum, Beijing; Luigi Pecci Center for Contemporary Art, Prato, Italy; Goliath Visual Space, New York City; MC Gallery, New York City; Jamaica Center for the Arts, New York City, and Dukwon Gallery, Seoul. She has participated in the Bienal de Yucatan, Mexico; and the Encuentro Nacional de Arte Joven, a year traveling exhibition around Mexico.

Karla Carballar holds a Master of Arts from the New York University, and a Bachelor in Graphic Design and Photography form Universidad Intercontinental in Mexico City. She is part of the multidisciplinary art group Lydian Junction.

She is an adjunct professor at The New York University and The National Academy.

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Faculty Studio #1: Gautam Kansara and Art 212-01, December 2013 – March 2014

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Faculty Studio is an ongoing collaboration between Professor Gautam Kansara and Manhattan College’s digital photography classes. In the last decade collaborative art practices have been catapulted  into the mainstream.  Teaming up and joining forces have proved to be integral to innovative cultural production, where skills and ideas are traded and nurtured within a collective. Faculty Studio aims to engage students with the professional art practice of their professor, ascribing to a philosophy of learning through practice. Elements from Professor Kansara’s studio have been temporarily relocated to the gallery space within Manhattan College’s Department of Visual and Performing Arts. In effect Kansara’s practice has been transferred to the college and opened to the academic community  à la an artist-in-residence. Using the classroom as a forum to create and develop works that utilize the visual and conceptual underpinnings of Kansara’s work, the students become active participants as they are instructed and familiarized with their professor’s practice.

Kansara’s current body of work addresses the changing nature of memory. As daily life becomes increasingly mediated by recording devices that augment, replace, and alter how events are experienced, the veracity of memory becomes malleable. The tendency to view live events through our cameras or phones is so ubiquitous that there is a negotiation between the way one remembers events in their own mind, and how these events are represented through various recorded media. The imagery goes through several iterations, first captured by a video camera, then corrected on a computer, then projected onto paper and re-photographed, pointing to memory as being increasingly fugitive, viewed through a lens that can be re-focused and overwritten.

“Artistic collaboration raises interesting and crucial questions about the nature of authorship and authenticity that inevitably disrupts the persistent and popular image of the artist as a ‘heroic’ solitary figure. Common to most collaborative practices is an implicit critique of the idea of the artist as a figure that stands outside of society engaged in an internal singular dialogue.”
-Mark Dunhill & Tamiko O’Brien, 2005
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Faculty Projects #3: Jacob Roesch, September 2013 – December 2013

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My work deals with the subtle relationship between imagined, perceptual and optically based occurrences. Fragments of the perceived world are explored in my paintings, teasing out the insignificant moments of beauty and chance that are encountered in daily life. These circumstances of beauty are often found in unlikely moments or locations and serve as a reminder of the precious and unexpected happenings of life. A constant struggle between reality and translation happens in my paintings; the process of their creation often becomes an exercise in allowing the material and action create instances which influence their outcome. These instances of minutia are meditative passages for me that can be carefully examined, revered and interpreted through material and surface.

Jacob Roesch is an artist and educator living and working in the tristate area. He received his BA in biology and fine arts from Hope College in Holland MI, MFA in painting from The Rochester Institute of Technology in Rochester NY, and Ed.M in the college teaching of fine arts at Teachers College, Columbia University in New York, NY. He has taught courses in painting, drawing, contemporary art history and design at a variety of schools including Teachers College, Kean University and Long Island University CW Post. He is currently teaching digital drawing and graphic design at Manhattan College, and spends the remainder of his time in freelance design and illustration, painting and restoring his 130 year old house with his wife and dog Fergus.


David Shull, Where there is great love there are always great miracles, January 2013 – July 2013

David Shull’s work is a response to the effects and modes of manipulation applied both overtly and inadvertently throughout our lives. Seeking sentimentalities, or short- cuts to deeper places in the viewer’s mind, David’s art employs many forms and medias to create alternate realities; forcing the notion that their “regular” reality may have farcical roots. His “alternate realities” are often made up of emotive modernist forms that subtly attempt to re-write a history at odds with its utopian goals.

David Shull is an artist and musician based in Brooklyn, NY. He received his MFA from The Pratt Institute in 2004. Since then he has showed extensively in brooklyn as well as abroad. Exhibitions include “The Report/Where Gone the Body” @ Secret Project Robot, Brooklyn (2013), “Growing the Garden” @ Secret Project Robot, Brooklyn (2012), “We Come from Brooklyn” @ Bleudenz, Austria (2011), “Other Spaces” @ Center 548. NYC (2010), “No Soul for Sale” @ X-Initiative, NYC (2009), “Gauge” @ ArtJail, NYC (2009), “It’s About Time, Man: A response to Olafur Elliason’s survey at PS1 and MoMA” @ Repetti Gallery, Brooklyn (2008)

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Faculty Projects #2: Marilyn Cvitanic, Biological Architecture, October 2012 – June 2013

The physical characteristics of my environment have been a great inspiration to my work in recent years. The right-angles and verticality of Manhattan’s landscape has led me to create an ongoing series of paintings called Biological Architecture. These watercolors reflect both my surroundings in New York City as well as the organic forms that I find so compelling in nature. Photography plays an important role in my process as I find myself documenting everything from local architecture to panoramic rural landscapes and the intricate patterns within stones, shells and flowers. The medium of painting allows me the freedom to experiment with scale by mixing the minuscule and monumental elements captured in my photographs. The translation of these inspirational sources, whether natural or manmade, depends upon an intuitive perspective that combines a constant fascination with color and form and fundamental love of painting.

Marilyn Cvitanic is currently an Adjunct Professor of Fine Arts at Manhattan College and the College of Mount Saint Vincent in Riverdale, New York, teaching courses in studio art, art history and costume history. Before entering a career in the arts Dr. Cvitanic received her Doctorate in Policy Analysis at the Pardee RAND Graduate School based at the Rand Corporation in Santa Monica, California. Upon completing her education, Marilyn began painting extensively and exhibiting her work in New York, Los Angeles and Croatia. Her paintings are currently available through Pierogi Gallery in Brooklyn and Offramp Gallery in Pasadena, California.

For more information see: http://marilyncvitanic.carbonmade.com/


Erick Montes, The ShortFellow, December 2011 – March 2012

Manhattan Project(s) is pleased to present new work by the multidisciplinary artist Erick Montes, a.k.a The ShortFellow. Montes’ practice is informed by his celebrated career as a dancer for the Bill T Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company and as an independent choreographer and movement-based artist. Photography from various performances spanning Montes’ career provide context to the collaged stories and performative actions that populate the work.

The focal point of the show is a series of videos that were made by Montes largely while on tour with the Bill T Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company in Paris, Washington DC, Arizona, Minneapolis, and New York City.

Directly after performing with the company, that same evening, Montes would stage and film performative movement-based actions in his hotel room. This time performing for the camera, for himself, on his terms, and with his choreography. It’s about a desire to do something with the lingering energy after performing for large crowds, to do something more intimate and private, yet it becomes about being adrift and transient.

Interspersed around the videos are a series of collages made from fabric, thread, and paper, which tell personal stories, some in spanish some in english, about love and being a Mexican immigrant living in New York City. Typed with an old typewriter and sewn haphazardly onto color swatches of fabric they are fragile and worn, they are put together fast, and they are raw but unabashed.

Erick Montes joined the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company in 2003. He trained at the National School of Classical and Contemporary Dance in Mexico City, and in 2004 he was featured in Dance Magazine’s “25 To Watch”. He holds a fellowship in choreography from The New York Foundation for the Arts. He has presented his choreography in Mexico, Colombia, and Spain. In 2010 he worked in collaboration with choreographers Jennifer Nugent and Yin Mey in the creation of a Ballet for the National Dance Academy of Beijing, China.





Sound Selections from UBU.com, January 2012 – March 2012


Chad E. Marshall, New Works on Paper, September 2011 – December 2011

“I’m not alone in needing to feel better about myself.  One of the easiest things to do has been to focus on my appearance, to create a glistening shell that other people are envious of.  Look cool but hollow.  So I consume, cause you can’t buy a new personality, but you can get those really exclusive sneakers and have people stop you on the street about “where’d ya cope those?”  Yes, on one level it’s a personal choice, but its also cultural, institutional.  You may not live in the best neighborhood, but you’ve got that new smartphone, that flat screen, those kicks.  You are “so fresh and so clean, clean!”  In the days and weeks after the towers fell we were not told to be introspective, but to shop.  Consumerism pushes this world view, it reduces us to stereotypes.  We need to look good, look powerful, look interesting, and it can all be bought!  This constant need to buy, buy more, the pressures are so great, so intense that the act of shopping, it’s a release.  The gods of love themselves are summoned, bloated by malaise, to bear witness to your purchase and its resulting euphoria. Sweet and satisfying… short, temporary, the pressures can’t wait to start building, again, the urges will need some new item to powder over some flaw.  The process becomes erotic, an addictive cycle where you distract yourself coveting the latest thing, letting the desires build, looking forward to that moment you can buy, you can release.”

– Chad E Marshall

Chad Marshall’s works on paper act as contemporary fables, not only because of their ties to religion and morality, but also as a result of how the work disguises the venting and social critique of the content by being entertaining and provocative. With a nod to the Br’er Rabbit stories, which the artist grew up with, the humor, sex, and general absurdity of the images is played up to counter the in your face aggression of the work’s meaning. Many of the characters in the work draw inspiration from ‘characters’ in Harlem, where the artist has lived since graduating from NYU in 2003. The look of the work, the eyeless facades, the preening grotesqueries, the background as void, work as an allegory to life experience, and are an overall statement on appropriation.

Exhibitions : 2006 Morning in America, Priska C. Juschka Fine Art, New York, NY. 2005 – New Art, New York: Reflections on the Human Condition, Trierenberg Holding AG, Traun, Austria. Kiss Me Long and Hard (group show), Priska C. Juschka Fine Art, New York, NY. 2004 -‘A Conversation,’ Marvelli Gallery, New York, Group. – Pool Art Addict, New York. Group. – 2003 – ‘Just Paint,’ Barney Bldg Commons, New York. Group. – 2001 – ‘Looks Good on Paper,’ Spruill Art Gallery, Atlanta. Group. – ‘18th Annual Print and Drawing Exhibition,’ Bradley University, Peoria. Juror: Mark Pascale, Associate Curator of Prints and Drawings Art Institute of Chicago. – 2000 – ‘2000 Delta National Print Exhibition,’ Arkansas State University, Jonesboro. Juror: Mark Pascale. – ‘Tao as Art’ Private residence, Washington, D.C. Group.. – Members Juried Exhibition #4, Art Station, Stone Mt. Juror: Anthony Hirschel Director Michael C. Carlos Museum Emory University. – – – Reviews – ‘Having an Art-to-art Talk,‘Fox, Catherine. Atlanta Journal and Constitution, 6 July 2001. – – – Awards – First prize Members Juried Exhibition, Art Station. 2000. – – – Education – MA, Studio Art with a focus in painting, New York University, 15 May 2003. – BA, Studio Art with a focus in printmaking, Morehouse College, 16 May 1999. – Visiting, Art, University of Maryland College Park, 1998.


Ximena Diaz, Futuro Perfecto, July 2011 – October 2011


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David Shull, “The Report Posters”, February 2011 – August 2011

The Report Posters #1-4, 2010, Large scale Xerox

David’s work is an investigation into the relationship between form, image, and space, and how meaning, such as a political message or a sense of empathy, gets communicated through the three. A mixed media amalgamation, the work is connected by its subtle use of formal approaches, embracing the viewer with the known while revealing a hidden agenda to the appropriation. Working in Photography, Video, Painting, Drawing, Sculpture, Sound, and installation; the tropes, or baggage, of the various mediums take on a semiotic presence, becoming a language in a contemporary story about an advancing world; a sort of contemporary hyroglyph.

The Report Posters, 2010, are large scale xerox collages created from numerous ink drawings largely sourced from NY Times editions.  The drawings focus on details from the newspaper that when taken out of context act as a collective stream of consiousness.  This subliminal history offers a form to the amorphous mass of information that pervades daily life.

David was born and raised in Southern California but has lived and worked in Brooklyn, NY for the last 10 years.  He has exhibited numerous times both nationally and Internationally during that time including Assemblage @ Artjail in NYC (2010); Other Spaces @ Center 548 in NYC (2010); No Soul For Sale @ X-Initiative in NYC (2009); Mexico City (2008). In 2007, he formed Left Coast Collective along with friends Sarah Frances Kuhn and Lane LaColla.  He currently plays drums and sings in Anita Fix and the Ecstatic Gestures.