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Sujin Lee, Sound Film, November 15, 2015 – February 4, 2016

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Sujin Lee

Sound Film

‘this landscape
Who Saw What’s on the Top Shelf?
Text to Speech (Statement)

Single-Channel Videos
2012-2013

Sujin Lee uses text, video and performance, exploring the way in which different cultural and linguistic systems affect the actions of language. Lee has been awarded residencies from Millay Colony for the Arts, Blue Mountain Center, I-Park and Newark Museum and participated in the AIM program at the Bronx Museum of Art and the Emerge program at Aljira. She was a 2012-2013 A.I.R. Gallery Fellow in NYC and a 2014-2015 artist-in-residence at Kumho Art Studio in Korea. Lee earned her BFA from Maryland Institute College of Art.  She holds an MFA in Studio Art and an MA in Performance Studies, both from New York University. She has exhibited internationally.

For more information, please visit http://www.sujinlee.org.

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Mallie Sanford, Single-Channel Videos, September 15 – November 15, 2015

Mallie01My work reflects upon a wide range of personal anxieties, which extend from body image to a deep concern for the environment. By combining scanned, found, and handmade objects with live performance and video, I build environments that stage humorous interactions between materials and the body and the anxious relationship between the two. Inventing ways in which an unstable material, form or image can be suspended or preserved is important to my process. I use a flatbed scanner to transform and store an object in digital space. When I scan objects it is in order to preserve and then liberate them as moving images. I integrate them into these videos and animate them in an attempt to transform the relationships and meanings of these objects. These processes of preservation and transmutation are central to the way I find spaces for objects. I have always been drawn to the color green because I grew up surrounded by plants, whether it was the creek in my backyard or my grandparent’s farm. The world of plants and shades of green have been a constant and productive space for me. Working with green-screening allows me to create my own personal ecosystem where I can integrate my own body into a space with these objects that I have transported into the digital. I layer green screen videos on top of one another in a desire to inhabit and develop this space. Through filling, layering, and manipulating digital materials and my digital self, I’m able to satisfy an anxious struggle that I feel to fill empty space.

Mallie Sanford lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. She studied Sculpture + Extended Media at Virginia Commonwealth University, where she received her BFA in 2014. She experiments in many different medias, which include video, performance, installation, painting, digital printmaking, sculpture and music. She has primarily shown her work in Richmond, Virginia, but is starting to become more involved in the DIY art and music scene in Brooklyn. Recent shows in 2015 include This One’s For You, Gallery 5, Richmond, VA; Hold the Phone, Circle Thrift and Art Space, Richmond, VA; and Bushwick Open Studios, R&D Studios, Brooklyn, NY.​

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Karla Carballar, Despúes de las historias de infancia, May 15 – September 15, 2015

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Carballar’s videos are performative actions, based on the artist’s solitary performance for the camera, they tell stories about mental states and personality traits. The camera follows the action as an objective observer, and the subtle transformation captured by it – in long, slow, real time shots – taking the audience on an emotional journey. Through movement, gesture, color, and sound the viewer is invited to enter the internal realm of the characters. The videos have the texture of a dream or a memory, where no questions will be answered, and after which an uneasy feeling remains.

Karla Carballar was born in Mexico City. Her work in video, photography and installation has been exhibited in the US, Mexico, Asia and Europe, including Ex Teresa Arte Actual Museum, Mexico City; Today Art Museum, Beijing; the Stadsschouwburg Theater, Utrecht, NL; Jamaica Center for the Arts, New York City, and Dukwon Gallery, Seoul. She was an Artist in Residence at the Watermill Center in October 2014 with the arts collective Lydian Junction. She has participated in the Bienal de Yucatan, Mexico; and the Encuentro Nacionald e Arte Joven, a year traveling exhibition around Mexico. Karla Carballar holds a Master of Arts from the New York University, and a Bachelor in Graphic Design and Photography form Universidad Intercontinental in Mexico City.

She currently lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

Priyanka Dasgupta, “pairi-daêza”, February 15 – May 1, 2015

Priyanka

pairidaêza
single channel video installation (silent)
5’23” (loop)
flat screen monitor

pairi-daêza, or ‘paradise’ as we know it today, signifies a place of harmony and contentment, removed from the miseries and suffering of human strife. Across cultures and religions, the word evokes a state of bliss, an utopia. A literal translation of this word however, means ‘to build a wall around’, where pairi translates to ‘around’ and daêza, from diz, to ‘build (a wall)’. This video, in its presentation of an apparent paradise, draws attention to this dichotomy – leaving the viewer with an oasis, that is ultimately just a mirage; an ephemeral, digital image.

Indian born artist, Priyanka Dasgupta’s installations comprise of multiple­channel video and sound pieces, interspersed with large­scale flat sculptures, reminiscent of shadow puppets. The work results from her transcultural identity and the conflicts that arise from this situation. Combining digital and traditional media, Priyanka works across disciplines, making use of multiple, visual language systems to layer the c​ross­​cultural dialogue that is implicit in the themes she explores.

Priyanka is the recipient of an N​EA g​rant (2004). She has participated in the T​ransparent Studio​residency at Bose Pacia (2012), A​ljira Emerge with Creative Capital​(2007) and the AIM Program​(2005), in New York. Priyanka’s installations have been exhibited in the US, Europe and Asia, including the Queens Museum, International Center of Photography, Jersey City Museum, Galleria di Piazza San Marco, the British Film Institute, Lalit Kala Akademi, and Seoul Art Space. Her work has been reviewed by publications including the New York Times, the Times of India, Art India and Take on Art.

Priyanka has a Masters in Studio Art from New York University & the International Center of Photography, and a Bachelors in English Literature from St. Stephen’s College, Delhi, India. She lives in New York, and teaches Contemporary Art and Media at New York University and City College. Priyanka is represented by Shrine Empire Gallery in New Delhi.

http://www.priyankadasgupta.com

Faculty Projects #5, Gautam Kansara, “Wearing Through News”, February 15, 2014 – April 15, 2015

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“Wearing Through News” is an ongoing project that focuses on “important” headlines on the front-page of the New York Times. The importance of a story or headline is usually delineated by the font size. In this project I have focused on headlines that are of the utmost importance according to the editors, in that the font is large and all the letters are capitalized. Such large, capital, bold-faced headlines used to be, in years past, quite a rare occurrence. However, in recent history, as the pace of world events has accelaerated, so has the appearance of these headlines. In 2014 there were more than 10, while in 2001 there were only 2.

The headlines are transferred to T-shirts through the analog photographic process of Cyanotype, which is in fact one of the earliest photographic processes, first discovered in 1842. The process involves a liquid emulsion, which means one can paint it onto almost any surface, like cloth, paper, wood, metal, etc. After applying the emulsion and letting it dry, a contact print process is used to transfer the image to the clothing. The article is then exposed to direct sunlight for about 20-30 minutes. Cyanotype is a UV sensitive emulsion, so the sun is all one needs. After exposing, the article is then simply washed with water in order to develop the image.

In “Wearing Through News” the T-shirts have also been toned with various types and strengths of tea, a common toning agent, to deepen and separate the color. In addition these particular images have gone through an extreme bleaching process that has weakened the fabric. The cotton and the polyester have begun to separate, which means that through wearing and washing the images of the headlines will deteriorate and flake off over time, a reference to the temporary nature of any news story as it rises and falls within the confines of the 48-hour news cycle.

Gautam Kansara (b. 1979, London) is an artist and educator based in Brooklyn, New York. Gautam’s video and photographic work is part of prestigious private collections including The Burger Collection, Hong Kong, The Shreya and Swapan Seth Collection, New Delhi, and the Permanent Collection of the Center for Book Arts, New York City. Since 2002 his work has been featured internationally in numerous exhibitions and screenings, including Alongside the Poison Dartz, Secret Project Robot: Institute for the Living Arts, Brooklyn, NY (2014); Faculty, National Academy Museum, New York City (2013); This is familiar, but I can’t remember now…, Dumbo Arts Festival, Brooklyn, NY (2012); Multiple, Unique, Limited: Selections from the Permanent Collection at The Center for Book Arts in New York City (2011); A Place of Their Own at BMB Gallery in Bombay (2010); No Soul For Sale at X-Initiative in New York City (2009), us between us at Real Art Ways in Hartford, CT (2008); Rencontres Internationales at the Reina Sofia Museum in Madrid (2008); We Will Always Be There For You at Kunsthaus Dresden (2008); TV Dinners at LMAK Projects, New York City (2007); AIM 26 at The Bronx Museum of the Arts in New York City (2006). Gautam has been an artist-in-residence at Smack Mellon, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council’s Swing Space, and the Center for Book Arts, all in New York City. Gautam is faculty at Manhattan College’s Visual and Performing Arts Department, and a adjunct professor at New York University’s Department of Art and Art Professions.

Faculty Projects #4: Gautam Kansara, excerpts from “Save As…”, November 2014 – February 2015

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In the video Save As…(Sculps #4) footage drawn from Kansara’s family life and social life vie for visibility. Each scene is repeatedly fragmented and rebuilt during a kind of tabletop performance, a back and forth of dominating elements. Throughout the process some sense of wholeness is restored to the imagery but it’s no longer the original, it’s not in it’s initial form. It’s been re-made through projection, performance and collage, through materials that include editions of the New York Times, mail/letters, flour, bleach, water, paper, glass, photographs, wood, film, and videos.

The impulse behind Kansara’s work is elusive. The imagery he has created is documentary based, a diaristic mix of memories that is both deliberate and arbitrary. More important than the images themselves is what becomes of them, the process of how they are altered, reconfigured, and overwritten. Put through formal and conceptual changes, the images are distressed, broken apart, reassembled, and rephotographed. Through an arsenal of analog transforming devices, maneuvers, and gestures the imagery as well as the soundtrack is continually fractured and repaired. Shapes that once indicated emptiness become architectural. Narratives are buried within noisescapes. Figures become tangles of line but still manage to emerge.

Untitled(Bleached, Erased, Forgot) consists of 12 bleached C-prints arranged in a partial grid. The images – analog color darkroom prints made by the artist – have been bleached to the point of erasure with only slight traces of the original photographs remaining. This act of destroying a previously made art object is double edged: it is violent, reckless, and sad, yet also an act of re-creation. Ultimately, Kansara positions this as a prism of actively forgetting, highlighting the transient nature of memory, of lived experience.

Daily life is increasingly mediated by recording devices that augment, replace, and alter how we experience events. The tendency to view and record live events through our cameras or phones is so ubiquitous that there is an inevitable negotiation between the experienced and the recorded reality in memory formation. Michael Specter, in his May 2014 New Yorker article, “Partial Recall”, tells us that “until memories are fixed, they are fragile and easily destroyed. It takes a few hours for new experiences to complete the biochemical and electrical process that transforms them from short-term to long-term memories. Over time, they become stronger and less vulnerable to interference. That process is referred to as consolidation by the psychologist Elizabeth Loftus from the University of California at Irvine.”

Elizabeth Phelps and Joseph LeDoux from New York University – according to Specter “among the nation’s leading investigators of the neural systems involved in memory” – posit that for memories to be recollected, the pathways in the brain in which the memory originated must be retraced, and that this act of recall actually changes the memory, a process scientists refer to as reconsolidation. Loftus expresses this with the analogy that “memory works a little bit like a Wikipedia page, you can go in there and change it, but so can other people”.

Specter says of the experiment by Karim Nader, conducted at LeDoux’s lab at New York University, that “Nader had demonstrated that the very act of remembering something makes it vulnerable to change. Like a text recalled from a computer’s hard drive, each memory was subject to editing. Whether the changes are slight or extensive, the new document is never quite the same as the original.”

Digital media and apps like Instagram have brought us into an era of memory profusion, where the sheer quantity of images leads to a devaluing of the past’s hold on the present. Terabytes of digital memories make us care less, as the archive comes to supersede the actual event until ultimately the recordings alter our memories of the events themselves, which are reduced to viewing experiences, where the narrative is open-ended and ripe for a remake.

The works as a whole exposes the malleability and fugitive quality of memory, which modern media saturation accentuates. Our memories are now viewed through a lens that can be re-focused, as well as stored in a document that can be overwritten through the mechanism of Save As…. Kansara’s video and photographic processes mirror the activity of our neural pathways and synapses through which recollections are constantly saving, updating, and transforming along the way. Tinkering with our memories happens while brushing our teeth. The telephone game with ourselves, past, present, and future.

Gautam Kansara (b. 1979, London) is an artist and educator based in Brooklyn, New York. Gautam’s video and photographic work is part of prestigious private collections including The Burger Collection, Hong Kong, The Shreya and Swapan Seth Collection, New Delhi, and the Permanent Collection of the Center for Book Arts, New York City. Since 2002 his work has been featured internationally in numerous exhibitions and screenings, including Alongside the Poison Dartz, Secret Project Robot: Institute for the Living Arts, Brooklyn, NY (2014); Faculty, National Academy Museum, New York City (2013); This is familiar, but I can’t remember now…, Dumbo Arts Festival, Brooklyn, NY (2012); Multiple, Unique, Limited: Selections from the Permanent Collection at The Center for Book Arts in New York City (2011); A Place of Their Own at BMB Gallery in Bombay (2010); No Soul For Sale at X-Initiative in New York City (2009), us between us at Real Art Ways in Hartford, CT (2008); Rencontres Internationales at the Reina Sofia Museum in Madrid (2008); We Will Always Be There For You at Kunsthaus Dresden (2008); TV Dinners at LMAK Projects, New York City (2007); AIM 26 at The Bronx Museum of the Arts in New York City (2006). Gautam has been an artist-in-residence at Smack Mellon, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council’s Swing Space, and the Center for Book Arts, all in New York City. Gautam is faculty at Manhattan College’s Visual and Performing Arts Department, and a adjunct professor at New York University’s Department of Art and Art Professions.

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Alumni Projects #1: Mastaana Eraifej, The River Runs Black In Jordan, August 2014 – October 2014

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Mastanna Eraifej presents a series of digital prints that began as small-scale charcoal drawings. The images are presented as diptychs that pair an enlarged reproduction of the original drawings alongside impressions the drawing left on the opposite page of the drawing pad. These remnants of the drawing process imbues the work with a sense of time and decay, and let’s the viewer know that the imagery was constantly changing, even slowly disappearing before being permanently captured through digital photography.

“My artwork is a refection of the distinct relationships I share with men and women. My work engages nude figures in unconventional settings in order to highlight the distinct and often blurred definitions of intimacy and violence that exist between men and women when they are physically vulnerable to one another. The figures are depicted in compressed charcoal surrounded by an intense black. The sinister yet intimate setting created portrays the characters as defenseless, fleshy, and exposed, yet unharmed and as willing to participants.”

Mastanna Eraifej recently graduated from Manhattan College (Class of 2014) with a B.S. in Biology. She currently works at the VA Medical Center as a Research Coordinator and continues to work on research focused on parasites at Manhattan College. Mastanna plans on continuing her education in science and to also pursue a master’s degree in public health. She lives in Westchester, New York and uses her dad’s office as a painting and drawing studio.

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